It Looks Frustrating

The warp was on the beam for a week before I had the stamina to sit down and tackle threading and sleying.  Still new at blogging, I forgot to take a pic of the warp behind the heddles.  It was gloriously chaotic, those pesky ends from the knitted blank love to curl and tangle.   I did manage to get a shot once the warp was threaded to give you a sense of the task.

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Yes, I use the “threading via treadling”  threading method ala Ingrid Boesel and I did have a one by one cross.  As the threads hang on the lease sticks at the back,  waiting for their turn to slip into the correct heddle, they rather like to “talk” to each other.  Then once through the heddles, they can easily curl back, wind around the adjacent heddle or thread, all kinds of mischief.  That means that sleying has to be done slowly and carefully, making sure the order is maintained.  Peggy Osterkamp says “The only thread that cannot tangle is one under tension”.  I am not sure if that is original to her, may have been a Jim Ahrens maxim, but I heard it from Peggy.   I think of it every time I work with one of Nancy Roberts’ knitted blanks.

Slow and steady, eventually conquering the warp, feels empowering.  (OK a bit of an exaggeration but not my much!)

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4 thoughts on “It Looks Frustrating”

  1. Empowering, yes! I think getting to the point where the threads are organized & under tension is one of the most satisfying steps in the whole process. But I’m one of those nutty people who finds warping more interesting than weaving.

  2. Wondering about the advisability of unwinding the blank into a skein and washing/steaming to tame the curl before measuring the warp and wrestling it on the loom. Of course, doing it your way will strengthen your character enormously in the process! 🙂

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